News from Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology. http://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep Read how the Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology is making headlines. en-us Tue, 18 Jun 2019 01:06:30 -0700 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss Drupal Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology to Host 2019 Commencement https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/05/pepperdine-graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-2019-commencement/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2019/05/pepperdine-graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-2019-commencement Ceremonies for the two divisions of the Graduate School of Education and Psychology will take place at Alumni Park on May 18. Thu, 09 May 2019 10:45:00 PDT Commencement ceremonies for the two divisions of the Graduate School of Education and Psychology will take place at Alumni Park on the Malibu campus on Saturday, May 18.

The psychology division ceremony will take place at 10 AM, and will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Jessica Henderson Daniel.

The education division ceremony will take place at 2:30 PM, and will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Frank E. Baxter.

Jessica Henderson DanielDaniel is an associate professor of psychology at the Harvard Medical School and an adjunct associate professor in the clinical psychology program at Boston University. She also serves as the director of training in psychology with the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health training program at Children’s Hospital in Boston. Daniel is a leader in her professional community; she is currently a member of the board of directors of the American Psychological Association, having served as the group’s 2018 president. 

Her career has focused primarily on training and mentoring, and she successfully advocated for Massachusetts regulations requiring psychologists to be instructed and trained about people of color, the only state in the country with such regulations. She has published several articles on mentoring and diversity-cultural training, and her contributions to the field have been recognized with awards from Harvard Medical School, the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, among many others.  

Daniel received her BS from Fayetteville State College, and an AM and PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana. 

Baxter is founding chair of the Alliance for College Ready Public Schools. He served as the United States Ambassador to Uruguay under George W. Bush, from 2006 to 2009. 

Since 1986 Baxter has been an activist in improving K-12 education for low-income students, and began work as a supporter of charter schools in Oakland and Los Angeles in the 1990s. In 2004 he was one of the founders of the Alliance for College Ready Public Schools, a high-performing Los Angeles charter management organization that now has six middle schools and 15 high schools serving 9,500 inner-city students. He has served as chair and co-chair since the organization’s inception. In 2010 the alliance started a transition to blended learning, a model that integrates teachers with 21st-century technology. Now seven schools use the blended learning alliance school transformation program.

Baxter is chair emeritus of the global investment bank Jefferies Group Inc. He has also served as board chair for After-School All Stars, board member of the California Institute of the Arts, a member of the Governor's Commission for Jobs and Economic Growth, vice chair of the Los Angeles Opera board, and chair of the executive committee of the Los Angeles Museum of Art. Baxter was also a trustee for the University of California, Berkeley Foundation and the I Have a Dream Foundation, Los Angeles Chapter. He is a former director of the National Association of Securities Dealers, served on the NASDAQ board, and was director of the Securities Industry Association.

Baxter graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a bachelor’s degree in economics with honors in 1961. Before college, he enlisted in the Air Force for four years. He is the recipient of the Bet Tzedek, House of Justice and the Getty House (Mayor's Residence) City of Angels awards, and is the winner of the 2018 Savas Award for Public-Private Partnerships presented by the Reason Foundation. 

For additional information, visit the Graduate School of Education and Psychology Graduation website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine GSEP Receives Grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/04/pepperdine-gsep-receives-grant-national-science-foundation-nsf/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2019/04/pepperdine-gsep-receives-grant-national-science-foundation-nsf The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a $100,000 grant to Pepperdine’s Graduate School of Education and Psychology, for a critical research workshop on next-generation science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning environments. Mon, 08 Apr 2019 17:00:00 PDT  

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a $100,000 grant to Pepperdine’s Graduate School of Education and Psychology, for a critical research workshop on next-generation science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning environments.

In looking for guidance in structuring research strategically around learning technology and education in the future, NSF set aside one million dollars for synthesis and design workshops that would create complementary strategy papers to address and guide future federal research investments.  Following an intense national competition for funding, Pepperdine joins nine other universities nationwide, each awarded $100K, to contribute to this strategic effort. Other recipients include the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Georgia Tech, University of Arizona, University of Washington, Carroll University, the University of Central Florida, and Stanford University.  Pepperdine’s project will be led by Prof. Eric Hamilton of the Graduate School of Education and Psychology,

Next May, Pepperdine will convene approximately 25 internationally prominent leaders in future learning environments.  It will first host a series of webinars in early 2019 that will culminate in the in-person workshop, to be held on the Malibu campus.  The workshop will focus on collaborative learning teams over the internet representing schools working together across cultural, economic, and national boundaries in ways that will likely prove routine in future education.

The focus is similar to an international STEM makerspace project currently overseen by Dr. Hamilton called the International Community for Collaborative Content Creation (IC4).  With participants from the United States, Kenya, Finland, India, Iran and Namibia, the IC4 Project explores how learning, collaboration, and culture influence each other when students work together globally on STEM–themed media projects in after school or other informal learning environments.  A video overviewing the project can be seen here.  For more information about the IC4 project, visit ic4.site. 

During this academic year, Dr. Hamilton is on leave and serves in the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO) International Bureau of Education in Geneva, Switzerland.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Relation-Based Leadership for the 21st Century https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/03/relation-based-leadership-21st-century/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2019/03/relation-based-leadership-21st-century Today's world can be volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous especially as globalization and technology are dramatically evolving, impacting every industry. How do leaders manage their organizations and team members to create a safe and productive space that thrives? Fri, 29 Mar 2019 15:00:00 PDT [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"7403","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","style":"width: 890px; height: 445px;"}}]]

From a strategic leadership standpoint, today’s world can often be characterized as volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (aka, VUCA). In a rapid space of time, globalization and technology are also dramatically altering the vast majority of industries we rely on. Organizations vying to compete in this precarious and ever-changing environment would be remiss to assume they can rely on 20th century leadership models for organizational design, human resource, and professional development processes. Instead, heads of organizations could greatly benefit from shaping and developing their culture to include leadership initiatives aimed at ensuring that stable, secure, collaborative and, most importantly, authentic relationships exist between managers and team members.

Challenging the paradigm that leaders must project high levels of steely confidence, strength and toughness at all costs, research and experience actually show that when humans, and leaders alike, are authentic and transparent in their communications about how they genuinely feel, and remain consistently available to those around them, that virtually unbreakable bonds of trust can develop through the vulnerability and openness shared. As a result, human attachment theory is now being seriously considered for its application to the workplace, since our most basic of needs has always been for safe and reliable connection to another.

Emotional responsiveness, availability and engagement are already known to be critical to the quality of the personal relationships that exist in our lives. In psychological terms, a regular lapse in any of these will eventually result in what is deemed an insecure attachment that, by default, will ultimately create unproductive human coping responses aimed at “solving” the insecurity and lack of safety one feels. The hardwired panic which ensues is then actually quite predictable, since all mammals recognize that their survival and safety rely on their belonging and importance to a group and its hierarchy. When the human brain detects a lack of responsiveness, by another (which, by default, includes a detached peer or an aloof, distracted, or inaccessible organizational leader), and when this pattern is maintained over an extended period of time, emotional dysregulation will, without fail, follow.  At this stage, fear and anxiety will quickly set in for any employee or team member who, while already contending with VUCA, simultaneously feels isolated or disconnected from a group or its leader. As a means of coping with a lack of connection during perceived threat, unhelpful human behavioral response patterns will mobilize. In the workplace, these fight, flight or freeze reactions will often manifest as apathy, aggression, withdrawal, or, at their worst, sabotage of an organization’s mission. Additionally unhelpful to the workplace are the numerous emotional responses that can ensue. High levels of frustration, irritation, distrust and downright despair felt by team members can ripple across an organization and spread, not unlike a fast-replicating disease. Unfortunately, for many organizations these overt and covert emotional responses will often go undetected, and thus, remain an invisible enemy working against its identified goals at the very time increasing levels of engagement, energy and creativity are required to remain competitive and relevant.

 

Leadership in the 21st century will greatly benefit from drawing upon our growing understanding of attachment theory, considering it is humans with emotions that are our greatest organizational asset. Progressive leaders will understand the need for the creation of warm, authentic and reliable bonds within and between management and staff that include a “felt” sense of support, accessibility, engagement and responsiveness. Those who succeed will remain keenly aware that while processes are important, it is emotion that drives behavior in organizations, both positive and negative. Any aloof avoidance or disengagement detected among the ranks, the kind that can easily develop from the unrelenting pressure and workloads managers and employees commonly face, is immediately addressed by the 21st century leader. In its place, he or she instead regularly models bonding conversations and interactions that include both emotional and physical availability, with the goal of creating trusting and secure attachments within the settings they oversee. Similar to securely attached members of a marriage or couple, challenges are then more effectively managed and the agility and flexibility required to adapt to changing circumstances is achieved. Whether relationships are personal or professional in nature, all humans must remain confident that, in the face of distress, they are solidly bonded to those they rely upon.

 

The ever changing and often threatening VUCA backdrop should not be underestimated, given its ability to create a sort of “collective group anxiety” that can propel an organization’s members into unhealthy and perpetual states of fight, flight or freeze survival patterns. Studies indicate that the most successful teams are those who are emotionally connected, and this makes perfect sense when the concept of “safety in numbers” is considered, which is essentially the need for humans to know that, without hesitation, they are never, ever, alone while in distress. Those at the top of organizations who demonstrate secure, authentic leadership that includes human vulnerability aimed at connection are essentially creating safe havens where colleagues and teams can thrive. The higher levels of mutual trust and respect that follow, directly lead to reductions in turnover, enhanced organizational commitment and improved employee attitudes which benefit organizations and employees alike.

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Evelyn Booth, M.A., earned her degree in clinical psychology from Pepperdine University and is a licensed Marriage & Family Therapist with specialization in the area of attachment theory and its impact on relationships.

Jonathan Silk, M.B.A, M.A is a Ph.D. student in the Global Leadership and Change program. His research interests are Leader and Team attachment styles and Team Psychological Safety. He is an Army Veteran, with combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, and served as a faculty member at the United States Military Academy member at West Point, NY.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Los Angeles Sparks President to Discuss Social Entrepreneurship at Pepperdine https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/01/los-angeles-sparks-president-discuss-social-entrepreneurship-pepperdine/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2019/01/los-angeles-sparks-president-discuss-social-entrepreneurship-pepperdine Christine Simmons will present “The Triple Bottom Line of Social Entrepreneurship in Today's Climate” on January 24. Tue, 22 Jan 2019 08:15:00 PST Christine SimmonsChristine Simmons, president and chief operations officer of the WNBA team Los Angeles Sparks, will present “The Triple Bottom Line of Social Entrepreneurship in Today's Climate” as part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology. The lecture will take place at the West Los Angeles Graduate Campus on Thursday, January 24, at 7 PM.

Simmons is in her fifth season with the team and the fourth in her official capacity. She leads all aspects of the team's business operations, including ticket and sponsorship sales and service, marketing, game operations, communications, community relations, and finance. Under her leadership, the team has seen a 50 percent increase in ticket sales and increased viewership on Spectrum SportsNet. Her efforts have also impacted nearly 70,000 lives through community programs. Continually applying her life philosophy of “do more - do good - do well,” Simmons believes that her responsibility is more than leading a franchise to win championships, but rather to elevate girls and women to be leaders and make a cultural impact.

Prior to joining the Sparks, Simmons was an executive vice president with Magic Johnson Enterprises, where she evaluated investment opportunities and was responsible for business development. She has worked with many Fortune 500 corporations and multi-million dollar companies, and has been on the business side of entertainment for over a decade working for organizations such as Disney and NBCUniversal.

For additional information about this free lecture, and to register to attend, visit the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series page on the Graduate School of Education and Psychology website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Former ACLU President to Discuss Free Speech and Censorship https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/11/former-aclu-president-discuss-free-speech-and-censorship/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2018/11/former-aclu-president-discuss-free-speech-and-censorship The event is part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at GSEP. Tue, 27 Nov 2018 08:15:00 PST Nadine StrossenNadine Strossen, former president of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), will present “HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship” as part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology. The lecture will take place at the West Los Angeles Graduate Campus on Thursday, November 29, at 7 PM.

Strossen expertly dissects constitutional law to share current challenges to current civil liberties, stimulating thoughtful consideration of democratic ideals. With her expert knowledge of the Constitution, Strossen is a unique and valuable resource for understanding the context behind policies and legislation that curtail civil liberties, such as freedom of speech. In her new book, HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship, she explores how speech is protected under the constitution and how free speech can be used to counter hate speech.

Twice named one of “The 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America” by The National Law Journal, Strossen draws from her two decades as president of ACLU and current post as professor at New York University Law School to highlight the dangers that follow efforts to serve justice by limiting civil rights. She also offers useful and applicable strategies for achieving positive outcomes without violating Constitutional rights. From government surveillance and decriminalization of drugs to sexual harassment and more, Strossen makes even complex issues accessible through the use of illuminating statistics and true-life stories.

HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship, will be available at the event for purchase and signing.

For additional information about this free lecture, and to register to attend, visit the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series page on the Graduate School of Education and Psychology website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Educator and Business Strategist to Explore Character Development https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/11/educator-and-business-strategist-explore-character-development/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/11/educator-and-business-strategist-explore-character-development The event is part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at GSEP. Wed, 07 Nov 2018 08:15:00 PST Ilene BezjianIlene Bezjian, executive director of theCongressional Medal of Honor Foundation’s Western Region, will present “Don’t Forget About Me! The Importance of Character Development for All Generations” as part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology. The lecture will take place at the West Los Angeles Graduate Campus on Thursday, November 8, at 6 PM.

At the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, Bezjian develops engagement strategies and strategic alliances with west coast organizations to perpetuate the legacy for Medal of Honor recipients. Her background in strategy and marketing brings a unique perspective to casting vision and setting that vision into motion. Prior to this role, Bezjian served as a senior consultant with The Genysys Group, a company assisting nonprofit and for-profit organizations and universities in the midst of change.

Having served as dean of the School of Business and Management at Azusa Pacific University for 14 years and as a marketing professor for 20 years, Bezjian led 25 faculty members through the steps of AACSB accreditation process. With 30 years of higher education experience, Bezjian has developed unique programs and opportunities for faculty and students alike, including a global program taking students around the world in one year while earning an MBA degree. 

For additional information about this free lecture, and to register to attend, visit the Graduate School of Education and Psychology event page on the Pepperdine website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Award-Winning Spoken Word Artist to Discuss Race and Digital Media https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/10/award-winning-spoken-word-artist-discuss-race-and-digital-media/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2018/10/award-winning-spoken-word-artist-discuss-race-and-digital-media Theo E. J. Wilson will examine civil conversations in the midst of disagreements. Wed, 17 Oct 2018 08:30:00 PDT Theo E. J. WilsonYouTube activist, speaker, and slam poet Theo E. J. Wilson will present “Race and the Internet: The Digital Shadow” as part of the Margaret J. Weber Distinguished Lecture Series at Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology. The lecture will take place at the West Los Angeles Graduate Campus on Thursday, October 18, at 7 PM.

Through “Race and the Internet: The Digital Shadow,” Wilson will examine civil conversations in the midst of disagreements, a discussion that was initially sparked when he was spurred by the racist comments individuals posted on his YouTube videos to assume an “alt-right” persona and pretend to be a member of the white nationalist movement. 

Wilson is the executive director of Shop Talk Live, Inc. The organization uses the barbershop as a staging ground for community dialogue and healing. In 2013 Wilson began speaking with “Rachel’s Challenge,” an organization dedicated to ending school violence through compassion. After viral video success beginning in 2015, he published his first book in 2017, The Law of Action. The book addresses some of the misconceptions about the law of attraction and the role direct action plays into manifestation.

With a passion for social justice, Wilson began his speaking career in the NAACP at the age of 15. He attended Florida A&M University, where he obtained his bachelor’s degree in theater performance. Upon graduating, he interned as a full-time actor at the St. Louis Black repertory company. Wilson is a founding member of the Denver Slam Nuba team, who won the National Poetry Slam in 2011.

The 2018-19 lecture series theme, “Living and Learning with Civility” is centered on the Martin Luther King Jr.’s quote, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” Each event will host a speaker or panel who will explore thought-provoking ideas, anchored in civility to produce positive change. 

For additional information about this free lecture, and to register to attend, visit the Graduate School of Education and Psychology event page on the Pepperdine website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
New Research Documents Benefits of Mobile Mental Health App Developed by GSEP Professor & Alumni https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/09/new-research-documents-benefits-mobile-mental-health-app-developed-gsep-professor/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/09/new-research-documents-benefits-mobile-mental-health-app-developed-gsep-professor The MoodKit mood improvement app, developed by GSEP Professor of Psychology, Drew Erhardt and alumnus Edrick Dorian (Psy.D., 2003) was recently evaluated in a randomized controlled trial conducted by David Bakker and colleagues in Australia. The study comparedMoodKit and two other apps based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a control group in a large (n=226) community sample. Compared to the control group, participants who usedMoodKit experienced significant increases in mental well-being and decreases in depression. The study appears in the journal Behaviour Research & Therapy. "We're pleased that the pace of research into the use of mobile technology to deliver aspects of CBT is picking up," says Erhardt, "and are particularly gratified to see evidence emerging for the benefits of MoodKit with respect to users' moods and well-being." Additional studies examining the benefits of the MoodKit app are underway. Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:15:00 PDT The MoodKit mood improvement app, developed by GSEP Professor of Psychology, Drew Erhardt and alumnus Edrick Dorian (Psy.D., 2003) was recently evaluated in a randomized controlled trial conducted by David Bakker and colleagues in Australia.  The study comparedMoodKit and two other apps based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a control group in a large (n=226) community sample.  Compared to the control group, participants who usedMoodKit experienced significant increases in mental well-being and decreases in depression.  The study appears in the journal Behaviour Research & Therapy. "We're pleased that the pace of research into the use of mobile technology to deliver aspects of CBT is picking up," says Erhardt, "and are particularly gratified to see evidence emerging for the benefits of MoodKit with respect to users' moods and well-being." Additional studies examining the benefits of the MoodKit app are underway.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine Alum Dr. Kathleen Plinske Named Valencia's New Executive Vice President, Provost https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/08/pepperdine-alum-dr-kathleen-plinske-named-valencias-new-executive-vice-president/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/08/pepperdine-alum-dr-kathleen-plinske-named-valencias-new-executive-vice-president Valencia College President Sandy Shugart has announced the appointment of Kathleen Plinske to the newly created role of executive vice president and provost of the college. Dr. Kathleen Plinske, who has served as president of Valencia’s Osceola Campus since 2010, oversaw construction of the college’s Lake Nona Campus in 2012 and was instrumental in mobilizing community and legislative support for the Poinciana Campus, which opened in 2017. She will continue to serve as president of the Osceola, Lake Nona and Poinciana campuses until a search for her replacement is completed. Thu, 16 Aug 2018 11:30:00 PDT Orlando, FL – Valencia College President Sandy Shugart has announced the appointment of Kathleen Plinske to the newly created role of executive vice president and provost of the college.

Plinske, who has served as president of Valencia’s Osceola Campus since 2010, oversaw construction of the college’s Lake Nona Campus in 2012 and was instrumental in mobilizing community and legislative support for the Poinciana Campus, which opened in 2017. She will continue to serve as president of the Osceola, Lake Nona and Poinciana campuses until a search for her replacement is completed.

As campus president, Plinske launched “Got College?,” a community-wide initiative that set out to increase the number of Osceola County high school graduates who attend college. During the first five years of that initiative, the county’s college-going rate increased more than 20 percent.

Plinske has also served as the principal investigator for $3 million in National Science Foundation grants that are part of a nationwide effort to increase the number of minority students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math.

In her new role, Plinske will lead Valencia’s planning process, help implement the college’s strategic plan and provide leadership to the college’s academic affairs, student affairs, educational partnerships and analytics and planning teams. She will also be charged with building relationships in the community, as well as with state and national organizations.

“Valencia continues to grow in scale, distribution and complexity,” said Shugart. “This has led me to create a new position of executive vice president and provost to help guide the college as we maneuver through the challenges ahead. Dr. Plinske is one of the brightest young leaders in American higher education and I have great confidence that she will bring to this new role the kind of innovations and insights that have made her an outstanding leader at our Osceola, Lake Nona and Poinciana campuses.”

A native of Crystal Lake, Ill., Plinske earned a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and physics from Indiana University; a master’s degree in Spanish from Roosevelt University in Chicago, a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Florida, and a doctorate in education from Pepperdine University in California. She is also a member of Phi Beta Kappa and in 2012 was named the Outstanding Young Alumna by Indiana University.

In 2016, she was named an Aspen Presidential Fellow for Community College Excellence and participated in the inaugural class training for community college leadership led by the Aspen Institute and Stanford University. She was selected as outstanding female of the year by the Orlando Business Journal in its 40 Under 40 competition in 2012.

For her service to the region’s Hispanic community, the Hispanic Business Council of the Kissimmee/Osceola Chamber of Commerce presented her with the Compadre Award and the Hispanic Chamber of Metro Orlando presented her with the Hispanic Community Champion Award in 2014.

Actively involved in the community, Plinske has served as the chair of the Education Foundation of Osceola County, president of the Rotary Club of Lake Nona, and currently serves on the board of CareerSource Central Florida.

In her spare time, Plinske is an avid golfer and a lifelong Chicago Cubs fan.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine Alum Fights for Children's Creativity, Old-School Style, With New Board Game https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/08/pepperdine-alum-fights-childrens-creativity-old-school-style-new-board-game/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/08/pepperdine-alum-fights-childrens-creativity-old-school-style-new-board-game Adam and Meghan Owenz (Pepperdine MA ’07), a Wyomissing, Pennsylvania couple and parents of two young children, have created a new board game, designed to bring families and friends together and encourage creativity. They came up with the idea for the game one day when they were discussing the “creativity crisis,” a term used to explain that children’s creativity has been steadily declining since the 1990’s. They both love to play games and often connect with family and friends on regular game nights and annual vacations to the Outer Banks. They got proof of concept by playing the game with any family and friends they could gather for the past year and half. On August 1st, they launch a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first big production run of the game. Wed, 01 Aug 2018 14:30:00 PDT [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"6806","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"344","style":"width: 480px; height: 344px; float: right;","width":"480"}}]]Adam and Meghan Owenz (Pepperdine MA ’07), a Wyomissing, Pennsylvania couple and parents of two young children, have created a new board game, designed to bring families and friends together and encourage creativity. They came up with the idea for the game one day when they were discussing the “creativity crisis,” a term used to explain that children’s creativity has been steadily declining since the 1990’s. They both love to play games and often connect with family and friends on regular game nights and annual vacations to the Outer Banks. They got proof of concept by playing the game with any family and friends they could gather for the past year and half. On August 1st, they launch a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first big production run of the game.

 

The game is called Starting LinesTM and the basic concept is simple: everyone gets the same starting line, a category card tells them the general theme, and then they have two minutes to turn that starting line into a drawing and caption it. All the drawings are turned into the judge for that round. “That’s my favorite part of the game,” says Meghan, “seeing how everyone started with the same line, but saw totally different things in it – that and the captions because they can make a drawing hilarious.”

 

They actually have the chops to back up their board game. Adam, a marketing professor, knows how to make and market a beautiful product. Meghan, a psychologist and professor, is an expert in child development and knows what kids and families will enjoy and what activities are correlated with positive child outcomes like creativity and academic success. The duo has worked together previously on projects. They run the website Screen-Free Parenting together. Despite it's counter-culture nature and self-limiting readership in the age of technology, their website has been very successful in the past two years. They have roughly 20,000 followers and have created materials emphasizing their S.P.O.I.L. SystemTM that are now used in schools, museums, girl scout events, and presented at national conferences. The SPOIL SystemTM emphasizes the basics of family life: things like time together (Social), playing (Play), adventures outside (Outdoor), chores (Independent work), and reading (Literacy). Thinking screen-time gets in the way of these things, they limit it and keep their children busy in other, more old-school ways.

 

“We wanted to create a game that all different types of families could play together. Not one where adults mindlessly move across a board based on a spinner or where younger kids can’t keep up with strategy,” Adam says. Meghan adds, “Kids are naturally more creative than adults, so this is a game where adults can try their hardest and still be beat by a seven-year-old.”

 

Their game may have come at just the right time. Schools are starting to recognize how important creativity and the arts is. With A for Art recently added to the STEM craze, (now STEAM) they hope their game can encourage art and creativity in elementary school students while they connect with one another and have fun. Recognizing and encouraging creativity might just be the key to success, as asurvey of over 1,500 business leaders listed creativity as one of the most important skills an employee should have. 

 

Meghan says, "We would love to see this to be a part of the movement towards recognizing the importance of creativity." Being a part of a movement is part and parcel to their Kickstarter campaign, which includes a give one/get one option. For less than the cost of two games, individuals can purchase a game for themselves and the duo will donate a second game to a shelter, school, kids club, or camp. They want all kids to have the opportunity to have fun and hone their creativity.

 

While the impetus for designing the game was the decline in children’s creativity, they claim the game is incredibly fun at adult game nights. They should know. They host them regularly. To prove their point, they are offering an adults-only expansion pack on Kickstarter.

 

Learn more about the game and the Kickstarter campaign at www.startinglinesgame.com

 

Other important facts and links:

For More info on Startling Lines, See the Following:

Kickstarter Full Video (3 minute): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUKXFMSjRoQ

Kickstarter Short Video (1 minute): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cujQ8ZJSTAE

Starting Lines Website: www.startinglinesgame.com

Kickstarter Details:

Launch on August 1st. Campaign runs until the end of the month.

Goal: $20,000

Game Cost: $20 for the first 100 customers; $25 thereafter

Screen-free Parenting: www.screenfreeparenting.com

 

 

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Graduate School of Education and Psychology to Host Better Together: California Teachers Summit 2018 https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/07/graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-better-together-california-teachers/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2018/07/graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-better-together-california-teachers Creativity and innovation expert Sir Ken Robinson will deliver this year’s keynote address. Tue, 24 Jul 2018 08:00:00 PDT Sheraton Gateway Los Angeles HotelThe Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology will host the fourth annual Better Together: California Teachers Summit at Sheraton Gateway Los Angeles Hotel, on Friday, July 27, from 8:45 AM to 12:45 PM.

The summit will bring together new and seasoned teachers at more than 30 locations across California to strengthen the state’s teacher network, share resources, and experience the concept of personalized learning.

Sir Ken Robinson, an internationally acclaimed expert on creativity and innovation, will deliver this year’s keynote address. In his remarks, Robinson will challenge the way California-based institutions are educating children and champion a radical reconsideration of the state’s school systems.

The event will also feature a TED-style EdTalks presentation given by teacher leaders, which will offer a variety of discussions in an Edcamp format led by teachers for teachers. This format encourages peer-to-peer dialogue and empowers teachers to lean into their own learning.

The summit is free and open to all California pre-K-12 teachers, teacher candidates, school administrators, and other educators, including instructional assistants, school psychologists, and school librarians.

For additional information, and to register to attend Better Together: California Teachers Summit, visit the Pepperdine University page on the Eventbrite website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Building Bridges, Not Walls: Intersectional Analysis and the Next Frontier in the Corporate Equality Movement https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/05/building-bridges-not-walls-intersectional-analysis-and-next-frontier-corporate-equality/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/05/building-bridges-not-walls-intersectional-analysis-and-next-frontier-corporate-equality The latest Publication of Nii-Quartelai Quartey, Lani Fraizer, Gabby Miramontes under the mentorship of Dr. Farzin Madjidi is featured in the Harvard LGBTQ Policy Journal. In recent years, we have seen a backlash to what had become a more LGBTQ-affirming America. The current national climate includes heightened support for laws that essentially give government and private businesses a license to discriminate based on sexual orientation; repeal of healthcare and employment nondiscrimination protections; and increase in hate crimes, including the then-largest mass shooting in US history at an LGBTQ nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Each of these issues has inherent effects on employee recruitment, retention, and performance and on individual and collective efforts to create an organizational culture where all employees can thrive without fear of retaliation, retribution, or being unaffirmed in the workplace. While “executive culture” has traditionally focused on returns for stockholders at the expense of their broader stakeholders, complicating social responsibility efforts, corporate America’s LGBTQ engagement has helped to create a paradigm shift through company-supported LGBTQ employee resource groups, business resource groups, volunteerism, philanthropy, and public policy advocacy efforts, that together have helped to make corporate America a critical ally in the movement for LGBTQ equality. The social unrest in the United States on issues related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status are challenging corporate leaders to demonstrate solidarity and be a lifeline to traditionally marginalized communities. At the same time, corporate activism on LGBTQ rights is being elevated as a civil rights issue among others all at once, causing a demand for increased competencies in intersectional analysis. Thu, 17 May 2018 08:00:00 PDT The latest Publication of Nii-Quartelai Quartey, Lani Fraizer, Gabby Miramontes under the mentorship of Dr. Farzin Madjidi is featured in the Harvard LGBTQ Policy Journal. In recent years, we have seen a backlash to what had become a more LGBTQ-affirming America. The current national climate includes heightened support for laws that essentially give government and private businesses a license to discriminate based on sexual orientation; repeal of healthcare and employment nondiscrimination protections; and increase in hate crimes, including the then-largest mass shooting in US history at an LGBTQ nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Each of these issues has inherent effects on employee recruitment, retention, and performance and on individual and collective efforts to create an organizational culture where all employees can thrive without fear of retaliation, retribution, or being unaffirmed in the workplace. While “executive culture” has traditionally focused on returns for stockholders at the expense of their broader stakeholders, complicating social responsibility efforts, corporate America’s LGBTQ engagement has helped to create a paradigm shift through company-supported LGBTQ employee resource groups, business resource groups, volunteerism, philanthropy, and public policy advocacy efforts, that together have helped to make corporate America a critical ally in the movement for LGBTQ equality. The social unrest in the United States on issues related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status are challenging corporate leaders to demonstrate solidarity and be a lifeline to traditionally marginalized communities. At the same time, corporate activism on LGBTQ rights is being elevated as a civil rights issue among others all at once, causing a demand for increased competencies in intersectional analysis.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine Graduate School of Education and Psychology to Host 2018 Commencement https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/05/pepperdine-graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-2018-commencement/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2018/05/pepperdine-graduate-school-education-and-psychology-host-2018-commencement The ceremonies will take place at Alumni Park on the Malibu campus on May 19. Thu, 10 May 2018 08:45:00 PDT Elise BuikCommencement ceremonies for the two divisions of the Graduate School of Education and Psychology will take place at Alumni Park on the Malibu campus on Saturday, May 19.

The education division ceremony will take place at 10 AM, and will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Elise Buik.

The psychology division ceremony will take place at 2:30 PM, and will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Kay Reified Jamison.

In March 2005, Buik made history by becoming the first female president and chief executive officer of United Way of Greater Los Angeles (UWGLA).

After seven years as marketing manager for a medical software company, Buik joined UWGLA in 1994 with a strong belief in the organization and a deep dedication to improving the quality of life in Los Angeles County. Starting in the marketing department, Buik worked her way up through the ranks with long hours and a steadfast commitment to addressing the city’s social and economic challenges.

Buik has been instrumental in transforming UWGLA into a community impact organization that identifies social issues, convenes experts, partners with other organizations, and crafts innovative solutions and policy. Under her leadership, UWGLA launched its strategic 10-year action plan, Creating Pathways Out of Poverty. The plan focuses on three critical issues: ending homelessness by providing housing stability, improving educational achievement, and helping families gain financial stability.

Her other roles include working with the City of Los Angeles Workforce Investment Board, a senior fellowship at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, membership on the advisory board of USC Sol Price School of Policy’s planning and development Master of Public Administration program, and the boards of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and Southern California Grantmakers.

Buik was honored with the 2009 Nonprofit CEO of the Year Award from the Los Angeles Business Journal, the Leadership Award at Peace Over Violence’s 37th annual Humanitarian Awards, and the Nonprofit Leadership and Responsibility Award at the 28th annual Edmund G. “Pat” Brown Institute of Public Affairs Awards Dinner.

Kay Reified JamisonJamison is a psychologist, psychiatrist, and writer. Her work focuses on bipolar disorder, a condition which she has dealt with personally since her early adult years. Jamison is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, as well as an honorary professor of English at the University of Saint Andrews in Scotland.

As one of the nation’s most popular writers of material examining manic-depressive illness, Jamison has written several books and articles detailing the complexities of, and ways to work through, mental illness. Her writings have helped patients diagnosed with mental illnesses and raised society’s awareness about these issues. She has won numerous awards for her written works.

One of Jamison’s most notable books, An Unquiet Mind, allows patients to read for themselves how destructive it can be for them to not take their medication. The book describes the healing power of structure, psychotherapy, and a social network. It affirms to patients that they are not alone and illustrates that the diagnosis need not have too much of a negative impact on their lives.

Jamison embarked on her study of clinical psychology at UCLA, where she earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She continued on to earn a PhD and later joined the UCLA faculty. Jamison founded and directed UCLA’s Mood Disorders Clinic, a teaching and research facility for outpatient treatment. She went on to the University of Saint Andrews to study zoology and neurophysiology. After many years of teaching at UCLA, Jamison became a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

For additional information, visit the Graduate School of Education and Psychology Graduation website.

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis wins two grants for inter-college research from Pepperdine University Provost's Office https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/03/dr-thema-bryant-davis-wins-two-grants-inter-college-research-pepperdine-university/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/gsep/2018/03/dr-thema-bryant-davis-wins-two-grants-inter-college-research-pepperdine-university GSEP's Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis along with her colleagues from Seaver College and School of Law was awarded two grants from Pepperdine University's Provosts office on March 15, 2018. In an inter-school collaborative research paper titled "Intimate Partner Violence in the Church: Current Trends and Effective Resources" Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis will partner with faculty from other schools to examine "intimate partner violence in the Church: the incidence, narratives, theories, and responses; and strives to help churches navigate this problem safely and successfully" The Graduate School of Education and Psychology wishes Dr. Bryant-Davis and her colleagues the very best as they embark on this very important research and study. Thu, 22 Mar 2018 13:00:00 PDT GSEP's Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis along with her colleagues from Seaver College and School of Law was awarded two grants from Pepperdine University's Provosts office on March 15, 2018. 
 
In an inter-school collaborative research paper titled "Intimate Partner Violence in the Church: Current Trends and Effective Resources" Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis will partner with faculty from other schools to examine "intimate partner violence in the Church: the incidence, narratives, theories, and responses; and strives to help churches navigate this problem safely and successfully"
 
The Graduate School of Education and Psychology wishes Dr. Bryant-Davis and her colleagues the very best as they embark on this very important research and study. 
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Graduate School of Education and Psychology
Pepperdine University to Celebrate Spring 2018 Commencements https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2018/03/pepperdine-university-celebrate-spring-2018-commencements/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2018/03/pepperdine-university-celebrate-spring-2018-commencements A robust lineup of speakers will address the graduates during the ceremonies. Thu, 08 Mar 2018 08:30:00 PST Pepperdine University will host commencement ceremonies for the School of Public Policy, Graziadio Business School, Seaver College, School of Law, and Graduate School of Education and Psychology on the Malibu campus throughout April and May.

The ceremonies will feature a robust lineup of speakers who will address the graduates as they embark on the next chapter of their lives.


School of Public Policy

Friday, April 20 | 10:30 AM | Alumni Park

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Sally C. Pipes

Sally C. Pipes is president and chief executive officer of the Pacific Research Institute, a San Francisco-based think tank founded in 1979.

Pipes addresses national and international audiences on healthcare and has been interviewed on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, 20/20, Dateline, The Dennis Miller Show, The O’Reilly Factor, The Today Show, and other prominent programs. She was featured in the special one-hour Fox documentary, Live Free or Die in New Hampshire, which focuses on the importance of innovation in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

She writes a biweekly healthcare column, “Piping Up,” for Forbes.com. Her healthcare opinion pieces have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and USA Today. She has published widely on the Affordable Care Act and published her latest book, The Way Out of Obamacare, in January 2016.

Pipes served as one of mayor Rudy Giuliani’s four healthcare advisors in his bid for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008. She has participated in prominent public forums, testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, House Oversight Committee, Senate HELP Committee, and the California, Maine, and Oregon legislatures. Pipes also participates in key radio shows nationwide, including The Dennis Prager Show, The Jerry Doyle Show, and The Lou Dobbs Show.

She received the Roe Award at the 2004 annual meeting of State Policy Network. In 2005 Human Events named her one of the “Top 10 Women in the Conservative Movement in America.” She was also featured in a new book, Women Who Paved the Way, as one of 35 most outstanding women in business in the nation.

Pipes is the founder and chair of the board of the Benjamin Rush Institute, a Federalist Society-type organization for medical students across America.

More information about the School of Public Policy commencement ceremony


Graziadio Business School

Saturday, April 21 | 10:30 AM | Firestone Fieldhouse

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Mike McCloskey

Mike McCloskey is the cofounder and chief executive officer of Select Milk Producers, one of the largest milk cooperatives in the United States. McCloskey also serves as the chair of the board for Fair Oaks Farms, an agriculturally-based operation in Indiana, which also brands and processes its own gourmet cheese, ice cream, and milk.

He founded the Southwest Cheese Company, where he serves as chair. The largest cheddar cheese plant worldwide, the Southwest Cheese Company is a joint venture between Select Milk Producers, Glanbia Foods, and Dairy Farmers of America. McCloskey is an officer and board member of the National Milk Producers Federation. He is the chair of the Sustainability Initiative of the Innovation Center of US Dairy, and a member of Rework America.

McCloskey attended the University of Mexico, where he earned his doctorate of veterinary medicine in 1976. He later attended the University of California, School of Veterinary Medicine, in Davis, California, where he completed a two-year post-doctoral program in dairy production medicine. He received the Alumni Achievement Award from the University of California School of Veterinary Medicine.

More information about the Graziadio Business School commencement ceremony


Seaver College

Saturday, April 28 | 10:30 AM | Alumni Park

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Gregory J. Boyle

Gregory J. Boyle is the founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, the largest gang intervention, rehabilitation, and reentry program in the world.

A native Angeleno, Boyle entered the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) in 1972 and was ordained a Catholic priest in 1984. In 1986 he was appointed pastor of Dolores Mission Church in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of East Los Angeles. At the time, Dolores Mission was the poorest Catholic parish in the city, located between two large public housing projects with the highest concentration of gang activity in Los Angeles. He witnessed the devastating impact of gang violence on his community during what he has called “the decade of death” that began in the late 1980s.

By 1988, having buried an ever-growing number of young people killed in gang violence, Boyle, Dolores Mission parishioners, and Boyle Heights community members sought to address the escalating problems and unmet needs of gang-involved youth by developing positive opportunities for them, including establishing an alternative school and day care program, and seeking out legitimate employment. They called this initial effort Jobs for a Future.

In the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, Jobs for a Future and Proyecto Pastoral, a community-organizing project started at Dolores Mission, launched their first social enterprise business in an abandoned bakery that Hollywood producer Ray Stark helped them purchase. They called it Homeboy Bakery. Today, Homeboy Industries employs and trains former gang members in a range of social enterprises, and provides critical services to 15,000 men and women who walk through its doors every year seeking a better life.

An accomplished community leader, Boyle is the author of the New York Times best seller Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion, which was named one of the Best Books of 2010 by Publishers Weekly and received the PEN Center USA 2011 Creative Nonfiction Award. He is the subject of the Academy Award-winning documentary, G-Dog. He has received the California Peace Prize and been inducted into the California Hall of Fame. In 2014 the White House named Boyle a Champion of Change. He received the 2016 Humanitarian of the Year Award from the James Beard Foundation, the national culinary arts organization.

Boyle holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and English from Gonzaga University, a master’s degree in English from Loyola Marymount University, a Master of Divinity degree from the Weston School of Theology, and a Master of Sacred Theology degree from the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley.

More information about the Seaver College commencement ceremony


School of Law

Friday, May 18 | 10:30 AM | Alumni Park

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Kenneth Feinberg

Kenneth Feinberg is an American attorney specializing in mediation and alternative dispute resolution. Feinberg was appointed special master of the US government's September 11th Victim Compensation Fund and served as the special master for the Troubled Asset Relief Program’s Executive Compensation. He most recently served as the government-appointed administrator of the BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster Victim Compensation Fund.

Feinberg worked for five years as an administrative assistant and chief of staff for US senator Ted Kennedy and as a prosecutor for the US attorney general. Before founding his own firm, The Feinberg Group (now Feinberg Rozen, LLP) in 1993, he was a founding partner at the Washington, DC, office of Kaye Scholer, LLP.

He has served as court-appointed special settlement master in cases such as Agent Orange product liability litigation, asbestos personal injury litigation, and diethylstilbestrol cases. Feinberg was one of three arbitrators who determined the fair market value of the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination and was one of two arbitrators who determined the allocation of legal fees in the Holocaust slave labor litigation. He currently serves as chair of the board of directors for the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation.

Feinberg has taught at Columbia Law School, University of Pennsylvania Law School, Georgetown University Law Center, New York University School of Law, University of Virginia School of Law, and Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1967 and a Juris Doctor degree from New York University School of Law in 1970.

​​More information about the School of Law commencement ceremony


Graduate School of Education and Psychology (Education)

Saturday, May 19 | 10 AM | Alumni Park

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Elise Buik

In March 2005, Elise Buik made history by becoming the first female president and chief executive officer of United Way of Greater Los Angeles (UWGLA).

After seven years as marketing manager for a medical software company, Buik joined UWGLA in 1994 with a strong belief in the organization and a deep dedication to improving the quality of life in Los Angeles County. Starting in the marketing department, Buik worked her way up through the ranks with long hours and a steadfast commitment to addressing the city’s social and economic challenges.

Buik has been instrumental in transforming UWGLA into a community impact organization that identifies social issues, convenes experts, partners with other organizations, and crafts innovative solutions and policy. Under her leadership, UWGLA launched its strategic 10-year action plan, Creating Pathways Out of Poverty. The plan focuses on three critical issues: ending homelessness by providing housing stability, improving educational achievement, and helping families gain financial stability.

Her other roles include working with the City of Los Angeles Workforce Investment Board, a senior fellowship at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, membership on the advisory board of USC Sol Price School of Policy’s planning and development Master of Public Administration program, and the boards of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and Southern California Grantmakers.

Buik was honored with the 2009 Nonprofit CEO of the Year Award from the Los Angeles Business Journal, the Leadership Award at Peace Over Violence’s 37th annual Humanitarian Awards, and the Nonprofit Leadership and Responsibility Award at the 28th annual Edmund G. “Pat” Brown Institute of Public Affairs Awards Dinner.

More information about the Graduate School of Education and Psychology commencement ceremony


Graduate School of Education and Psychology (Psychology)

Saturday, May 19 | 2:30 PM | Alumni Park

Honorary Doctorate Recipient: Kay Reified Jamison

Kay Reified Jamison is a psychologist, psychiatrist, and writer. Her work focuses on bipolar disorder, a condition which she has dealt with personally since her early adult years. Jamison is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, as well as an honorary professor of English at the University of Saint Andrews in Scotland.

As one of the nation’s most popular writers of material examining manic-depressive illness, Jamison has written several books and articles detailing the complexities of, and ways to work through, mental illness. Her writings have helped patients diagnosed with mental illnesses and raised society’s awareness about these issues. She has won numerous awards for her written works.

One of Jamison’s most notable books, An Unquiet Mind, allows patients to read for themselves how destructive it can be for them to not take their medication. The book describes the healing power of structure, psychotherapy, and a social network. It affirms to patients that they are not alone and illustrates that the diagnosis need not have too much of a negative impact on their lives.

Jamison embarked on her study of clinical psychology at UCLA, where she earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She continued on to earn a PhD and later joined the UCLA faculty. Jamison founded and directed UCLA’s Mood Disorders Clinic, a teaching and research facility for outpatient treatment. She went on to the University of Saint Andrews to study zoology and neurophysiology. After many years of teaching at UCLA, Jamison became a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

More information about the Graduate School of Education and Psychology commencement ceremony

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Graduate School of Education and Psychology