News from Pepperdine University School of Public Policy. http://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy Read how the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy is making headlines. en-us Tue, 18 Jun 2019 01:05:45 -0700 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss Drupal SPP Alumna Hanna Skandera (MPP '00) will Lecture on Education Leadership this Fall https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/06/spp-alumna-hanna-skandera-mpp-00-will-lecture-education-leadership-fall/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/06/spp-alumna-hanna-skandera-mpp-00-will-lecture-education-leadership-fall Hanna Skandera (MPP '00) will serve as the Visiting Professor of Education Policy and Impact, leading a course on education leadership, policy, and politics for the Fall 19-20 academic year. Mon, 10 Jun 2019 17:00:00 PDT School of Public Policy Faculty - Hanna Skandera

The Pepperdine School of Public Policy is proud to announce that Hanna Skandera (MPP '00) will serve as the Visiting Professor of Education Policy and Impact, leading a course on education leadership, policy, and politics for the Fall 19-20 academic year.

Skandera has leveraged her Master of Public Policy degree to serve in significant public policy roles with broad impact across the country for three governors and a US president, most recently as the Secretary of Education for the State of New Mexico under Governor Susana Martinez. She has a track record of realizing record-breaking outcomes, including graduation rates reaching an all-time high, AP course enrollment more than doubling, and the dramatic reduction of high school graduates’ college remediation rates.

"While we've taught education policy courses regularly over the years here at SPP, our new Visiting Professor of Education Policy and Impact marks a new focus on preparing public policy leaders across government and nonprofit sectors," dean Pete Peterson notes. "In the midst of a respected career as a leader in education policy, we're delighted to welcome Hanna back to Malibu to both teach our grad students and help strategize our future programs in this field."

“Education is foundational to America’s fabric and developing impactful leaders who are passionate and prepared for the challenge is critical to delivering on our promise for all students,” adds Skandera. “I am grateful for so many mentors who have invested in me and my peers and look forward to shaping the next generation of leaders through this opportunity.”

Currently, Skandera is the chief executive officer of Mile High Strategies serving as an education and employability entrepreneur, thought leader, senior advisor, and executive coach in leadership development and strategy, growing organizational impact, and transforming organizational culture. Skandera is also editor-in-chief of The Line, founder of Pathway 2 Tomorrow, chief in residence with Chiefs for Change, superintendent in residence with the Broad Center, and a former distinguished teaching fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

In addition to serving as secretary of education for the State of New Mexico under Susana Martinez, she served as undersecretary for Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, deputy commissioner for Governor Jeb Bush and deputy chief of staff, and senior policy advisor for US Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. Skandera was also a research fellow with the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a Pahara-Aspen Institute fellow. Skandera graduated cum laude with a degree in business from Sonoma State University and graduated at the top of her class from the Pepperdine School of Public Policy.

She serves on the Colorado Community College Board, Daniels Fund Board, Great Cities, Great Schools Advisory Committee, Uncharted Learning Advisory Board, Code.org Board, Pepperdine School of Public Policy Advisory Committee, is chair of the George W. Bush Center Education Advisory Board, and is former chair of Chiefs for Change, a bipartisan policy and advocacy organization she launched.

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School of Public Policy
Dr. Ted McAllister Releases New Book on American Conservatism https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/06/dr-ted-mcallister-releases-new-book-american-conservatism/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/06/dr-ted-mcallister-releases-new-book-american-conservatism McAllister and Frohnen argue that Americans are a conservative people whose institutions, ways of life, and fundamental beliefs, have been under assault by a progressive elite for several generations. Wed, 05 Jun 2019 14:15:00 PDT Coming Home: Reclaiming America's Conservative Soul

Ted McAllister, Edward L. Gaylord Chair and associate professor of public policy at the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, and co-author with Bruce Frohnen, professor of law at Ohio Northern  University College of Law, recently launched their new book Coming Home: Reclaiming America's Conservative Soul.

McAllister and Frohnen argue that Americans are a conservative people whose institutions, ways of life, and fundamental beliefs, have been under assault by a progressive elite for several generations. The result has been a kind of cultural destruction that has left a great many Americans "homeless"—lacking the sense of belonging and attachment that are the hallmarks of healthy societies and cultures.

This book is part of an effort to reclaim America by stressing our common story (history) and by reinvigorating the natural institutions like family and voluntary associations that connect us to one another and to our common purposes. Underneath it all is the call by the authors to reclaim our most basic national identity as self-governing people from those who have foisted on us an administrative state to replace our republic and who are seeking to use their cultural and social power to change who we are as a people—to transform us.

 

This book is currently the #1 new release in Natural Law on Amazon.

 

Learn more: Coming Home: Reclaiming America's Conservative Soul.

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School of Public Policy
Pepperdine School of Public Policy Forms New Academic Enterprise with Los Angeles Homeland Security Advisory Council https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/05/pepperdine-school-public-policy-forms-new-academic-enterprise-los-angeles/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2019/05/pepperdine-school-public-policy-forms-new-academic-enterprise-los-angeles The Homeland Security Advisory Council at the School of Public Policy will focus on disaster preparedness, crisis management, and resiliency through engaging the public, private, and civic sectors. Mon, 20 May 2019 11:00:00 PDT The Pepperdine School of Public Policy has announced it will form an innovative academic enterprise with the Los Angeles Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) focused on disaster preparedness, crisis management, and resiliency through engaging the public, private, and civic sectors. The new enterprise, to be called the Homeland Security Advisory Council at the School of Public Policy, is positioned to prepare the current and next generation of public leaders by harnessing the school’s unique curriculum dedicated to exploring a full range of cross-sector and information technology solutions to public policy challenges. The formation of this enterprise with HSAC, a current 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that seeks to ensure the security and resilience of the Los Angeles region in the face of threats and hazards, will include the transfer of all HSAC assets and intellectual property to Pepperdine and is a strategic step for the University in expanding its role around issues facing crisis management today.

“Through the trail-blazing, innovative work of the Los Angeles Homeland Security Advisory Council, we are actually seeing viable solutions to issues important to our community,” said Pepperdine president Andrew K. Benton. “That Pepperdine, through its School of Public Policy, is going to have a major hand in this important and shaping effort is a great opportunity and a point of pride. We hope to use this opportunity to build social capital in greater Los Angeles and help make our community a safer, more caring place for all of our citizens.”

HSAC currently offers a variety of programs focused on technology, engagement, capability building, and partnerships for crisis managers, policymakers, and public safety professionals, in addition to students pursuing a master’s or doctoral degree. Through the partnership with the School of Public Policy, HSAC will expand its current offerings, create new educational and training programs, and reach a broader participant group that includes graduate students and audiences throughout California and the nation.

“With the combination of educational programs and technology, it's fair to say that the launch of the new Homeland Security Advisory Council at the School of Public Policy is a groundbreaking initiative in American higher education,” said Pete Peterson (MPP ’07), dean of the School of Public Policy. “Where else should something creative like this happen but here in Los Angeles?”

Demonstrating a shared commitment to service, community, and the public good, the move also includes the acquisition of HSAC’s crisis and event management platform, SALUS - The Crisis Hub, which uses geographic information systems (GIS) to manage and analyze data in order to build upon existing relationships with municipal and state governments. GIS is typically used to visualize information, such as patterns and relationships, and helps crisis managers make informed decisions and gain a more complete situational awareness before, during, and after a crisis or major event. SALUS also supports and facilitates strategies that address homelessness in Los Angeles by providing a single, common platform accessible to the mayor’s office and all 16 departments in the city’s Unified Homelessness Response Center.

“Since its inception in 2002, HSAC has become indispensable to improving public safety communication and collaboration in Los Angeles,” said Peter Lowy, chair of HSAC. “The result is an L.A. region that is today better prepared, more secure, and increasingly more resilient in the face of threats and hazards. This new academic enterprise at the Pepperdine School of Public Policy is driven by our shared dedication to serving diverse communities with growing needs. I am eager to see the strength of our combined efforts in utilizing emerging technologies to advance meaningful policy solutions throughout Greater Los Angeles.”

HSAC is led by Lowy, who helms an active and dynamic board of influential Angelenos, and president and CEO Jim Featherstone, who joined the organization in 2016 after 30 years with the City of Los Angeles. Lowy will be named a Senior Fellow at the School of Public Policy, and Featherstone will serve as executive director of the new enterprise at Pepperdine. Additionally, the organization will continue to benefit from the guidance of distinguished board members including Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti, who serves as honorary chair; Los Angeles fire chief Ralph Terrazas; Los Angeles County fire chief Daryl Osby; and Los Angeles police chief Michael Moore. HSAC also presently counts among its partners leading philanthropic organizations, including The Ahmanson Foundation and the Annenberg Foundation.

"Building a more resilient Los Angeles requires that we tap every resource at our disposal—and that means deepening partnerships with HSAC, relying on critical insights from institutions like Pepperdine, and equipping our leaders and first responders with vital data from SALUS in the face of disruptions, crises, or natural disasters," said Garcetti. "Our top priority is keeping Angelenos safe and secure, and we will continue to deploy every tool in our arsenal to strengthen public safety across our city."   

HSAC was founded jointly between James K. Hahn, then mayor of the City of Los Angeles, Lee Baca, then sheriff of Los Angeles County, and key leaders in business and philanthropy in partnership with the City and County of Los Angeles in 2002 following the September 11 terrorist attacks. The initiative sought to create a local, all-sector network that would enhance the Los Angeles region’s resilience to large-scale disasters, including active threats, earthquakes, wildfires, pandemics, severe weather, and cyber attacks. Since 2016 HSAC has pivoted its focus to better serve the evolving needs of local crisis managers and continues to build strategic partnerships among the private, public, and civic sectors, which serves to engage regional public safety leaders and stakeholders so they may advance creative public safety solutions.

“The Annenberg Foundation has supported initiatives like HSAC that utilize technology to foster improved communication and collaboration to positively impact our city,” said Wallis Annenberg. “Our longstanding commitment to education is another way in which we seek to strengthen communities. We applaud the new HSAC endeavor with Pepperdine to grow the organization's ability to strengthen Los Angeles and help foster our next generation of crisis leaders."

The HSAC annual gala, under its new auspices with Pepperdine, will be held on September 17, 2019, in Los Angeles and will honor Pepperdine president Andrew K. Benton and Wendy Greuel, former L.A. city controller and city councilwoman and a current HSAC board member.

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Retiring Manhattan Institute President Lawrence J. Mone Receives Honorary Degree https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/05/retiring-manhattan-institute-president-lawrence-j-mone-receives-honorary-degree/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/05/retiring-manhattan-institute-president-lawrence-j-mone-receives-honorary-degree SPP conferred an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree—the highest academic recognition Pepperdine University can bestow—upon Lawrence J. Mone, retiring president of the Manhattan Institute. Mon, 06 May 2019 16:15:00 PDT Pepperdine President Andrew Benton and Lawrence "Larry" Mone

On Friday, April 26th the Pepperdine School of Public Policy (SPP) held it's 21st graduation ceremony on Alumni Park. At this ceremony, SPP conferred an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree—the highest academic recognition Pepperdine University can bestow—upon Lawrence J. Mone, retiring president of the Manhattan Institute. Mone served as president of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research (MI) for 25 years totaling in 35 years of combined service and dedication to this free-market think tank. He delivered a speech to the graduating class of 2019 reflecting on policy-making and actions in America.

"Turning intellect into action is at the core principles of the institution," said Mone, and goes on to tell the graduates, "policy, fundamentally, is implementation."

Reflecting on examples of adopting policy, Mone shared his experience with the Center for Educational Innovation (CEI), a non-profit education organization, that proved to reduce truancy and discipline problems while raising test scores in schools. MI partnered with CEI to formulate a plan that helped move their message across the world to help meet the needs of students in low-performing cities.

In addition to unique demands, there comes unique solutions. Understanding that there can be local solutions to global threats, MI created an in-house think tank to train New York police officers in counter-terrorism as a response to the 9/11 attack.

Mone addressed three lessons drawn from experiences of the past. The first being, casting a wide net of partnering with people of different backgrounds and expertise usually yields the best results. In a combination of government officials, academics, philanthropists, business people, and more, when you take away one the chance of success drops. Second, patience is the best practice in policy-making because it can take several years to make a substantial change. Lastly, "before you can make policy, you have to win arguments in the real world."

Mone acknowledged one must "be willing to reach across the aisle," no matter what side you may lean towards in order to work with other people and implement change.

Watch 2019 SPP Graduation Ceremony.

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American Project @ SPP: Is the 'Eggshell Culture' on Campus Moving Into Our Public Square? https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/04/american-project-spp-eggshell-culture-campus-moving-our-public-square/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/04/american-project-spp-eggshell-culture-campus-moving-our-public-square Pete Peterson builds upon the borrowed term "eggshell culture" to describe free speech on America's college campuses. Mon, 22 Apr 2019 09:00:00 PDT Pete Peterson - Dean Pepperdine School of Public Policy

At the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, "The American Project: On the Future of Conservatism" is a multi-year program to propel innovative ideas for reimagining the future of America's conservative movement.

In the RealClearPolicy series, writers and scholars—through a collection of essays—grapple with the core tenets of the American Project from various points of view guided by the conviction that by getting back to first political principles we can better understand and respond to our present political moment.

Pete Peterson, dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, builds upon the borrowed term "eggshell culture" to describe free speech on America's college campuses.

Read more on "Is the 'Eggshell Culture' on Campus Moving Into Our Public Square?" >

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May 2: Victor Davis Hanson, Trump: Tragic Hero... or Just Tragic? https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/04/may-2-victor-davis-hanson-trump-tragic-hero-or-just-tragic/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/04/may-2-victor-davis-hanson-trump-tragic-hero-or-just-tragic Victor Davis Hanson, award-winning historian and political commentator will discuss his new book, The Case for Trump Wed, 17 Apr 2019 12:00:00 PDT Victor Davis Hanson-Pepperdine University

Join the School of Public Policy on Thursday, May 2, 2019, at 6:00 PM at the California Club in Los Angeles for its annual Patricia Tagliaferri Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series.

Victor Davis Hanson, award-winning historian and political commentator will discuss his new book, The Case for Trump, where he explores how a celebrity businessman with no political or military experience triumphed over sixteen well-qualified Republican rivals, a Democrat with a quarter-billion-dollar war chest, and a hostile media and Washington establishment to become president of the United States. Trump saw a political opportunity in defending the working people of America's interior whom the coastal elite of both parties had come to scorn, Hanson argues. And Trump alone had the instincts and energy to pursue this opening to victory, dismantle a corrupt old order, and bring long-overdue policy changes at home and abroad. Hanson contends that while we could not survive a series of presidencies as volatile as Trump’s, after decades of drift, America needs the outsider Trump to do what normal politicians would not and could not do.

The Patricia Tagliaferri Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series was established through an endowment for the School of Public Policy by benefactor Dr. Gus Tagliaferri. From its founding, the School of Public Policy has uniquely considered the role the Great Ideas play in shaping sustainable policy and great leaders. 

**Registration is required as seating is limited.** Reception will begin at 6 PM, lecture will begin at 6:30 PM.

To learn more and register, please visit the event page.

Directions to the California Club

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American Project @ SPP: The Case for Local Government https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/04/american-project-spp-case-local-government/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/04/american-project-spp-case-local-government Michael Hendrix emphasizes the need to trust local governments in ways of coming together as a community and as the building block of the American Project. Thu, 11 Apr 2019 14:45:00 PDT Michael Hendrix

At the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, "The American Project: On the Future of Conservatism" is a multi-year program to propel innovative ideas for reimagining the future of America's conservative movement.

In the RealClearPolicy series, writers and scholars—through a collection of essays—grapple with the core tenets of the American Project from various points of view guided by the conviction that by getting back to first political principles we can better understand and respond to our present political moment.

With only three-quarters of Americans trusting their local government, only 40 percent of Congress trusts our country's legislative branch. Michael Hendrix, director of state and local policy at the Manhattan Institute, emphasizes the need to trust local governments in ways of coming together as a community and as the building block of the American Project.

Read more on "The Case for Local Government" >

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School of Public Policy to Host Spring 2019 Commencement https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/04/school-public-policy-host-spring-2019-commencement/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/04/school-public-policy-host-spring-2019-commencement The Pepperdine School of Public Policy will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Lawrence J. Mone. Mon, 08 Apr 2019 10:45:00 PDT Larry Mone

The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy spring 2019 commencement ceremony will take place at Alumni Park in Malibu on Friday, April 26, at 10:30 AM. The event will bestow an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree upon Lawrence J. Mone.

Mone is the president of the Manhattan Institute, which he joined in 1982 as a public-policy specialist. Mone worked his way up the institute’s ranks to project manager and then vice president, taking the helm as its fourth president in 1995. He will retire from the institute this year. 

Mone is devoted to the causes the institute promotes: free markets, free societies, and the rule of law. During his 24-year tenure as its leader, the organization has consistently sought to put policy prescriptions into practice. It has worked to rezone much of New York City’s long-neglected industrial spaces and, at the request of the New York Police Department, the institute launched a new policy division to advise it on cutting-edge counterterrorism strategy following the attacks of September 11. 

The institute collaborated with then mayor of Newark Cory Booker to implement a new approach to prisoner reentry, based on the principle of connecting former offenders with paid work immediately upon release. On the state and national levels, the institute has also led on policy changes in the areas of school choice and charter schools, the marketplace for healthcare, and the role of law enforcement in our society. 

Mone earned a bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross and a master of arts in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1982. 

 

Distinguished Alumnus Award

Nicole Neily - Pepperdine School of Public Policy Alumni

This year, Nicole Kurokawa Neily (MPP '06) will receive the Distinguished Alumnus Award. She is the president of Speech First, a membership-based organization that defends the free speech rights of university students across the nation through advocacy and litigation. Since its launch last year, the organization has amassed a following of concerned constituents and has filed multiple lawsuits on behalf of its members, including active federal court cases against two state universities.

Before joining Speech First, Neily served as president of the Franklin Center for Government and Policy Integrity, an investigative journalism nonprofit focused on highlighting cronyism and government overreach. She has also served as executive director and senior fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum and manager of external relations at the Cato Institute and has held prominent positions in the private sector, having been senior vice president at Dezenhall Resources and director of research analysis at the Winston Group. In addition, she has volunteered on the American Swiss Foundation’s Young Leaders Alumni Council and on the boards of Alumni for Liberty and Young Voices.

Nicole Neily earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Illinois and received her master of public policy from the Pepperdine School of Public Policy.

Student Address

Brandon Ristoff - Pepperdine School of Public Policy

Brandon Ristoff will present the student address. He is receiving his Master of Public Policy degree, specializing in Applied Economic Policy. At the School of Public Policy, he was the President of the Churchill Society and was an editor for the Pepperdine Policy Review. During this program, Ristoff interned for Congressman Warren Davidson on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Prior to Pepperdine, he studied the Great Books of Western Civilization at Thomas Aquinas College and received his Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts.

 

 

More information about the School of Public Policy commencement ceremony.

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School of Public Policy
The Pepperdine School of Public Policy Joins the Public Interest Technology University Network https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/03/pepperdine-school-public-policy-joins-public-interest-technology-university/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/03/pepperdine-school-public-policy-joins-public-interest-technology-university The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy joins the Public Interest Technology University Network (PIT-UN) as one of 21 founding member institutions. Tue, 12 Mar 2019 17:00:00 PDT

PIT-UN

MALIBU - March 13, 2019 -The Pepperdine University School of Public Policy joins the Public Interest Technology University Network (PIT-UN) as one of 21 founding member institutions. Launched by a collaboration comprised of the Ford Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, and New America Foundation; PIT-UN is composed of leading academic institutions working at the intersection of the public, technology, and government agencies.
 
"I'm very excited about the opportunities provided by this new network," said Pete Peterson, dean of the School of Public Policy. "Our work over the last several years—both inside and outside the classroom—has involved preparing leaders in local and state government to use technology in ways that make government more transparent and responsive. This nationwide association offers great promise to broaden the impact of these efforts." 
 
Along with its Master of Public Policy (MPP) coursework offerings, the School of Public Policy has increased its early- and mid-career seminars and professional certificate classes in topics ranging from public engagement skills to government technology. "We've trained more than 2,500 local government leaders over the last decade in how to better involve the public in policy making, and I look forward to our membership in this new network expanding our training in government technology," said Ashley Trim (MPP '09), executive director of the school's Davenport Institute for Public Engagement.
 
Each institution will focus on some or all of these elements, relevant to establishing public interest technology on campus:
 
1. Support curriculum and faculty development to enable interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary education of students, so they can critically assess the ethical, political, and societal implications of new technologies, and design technologies in service of the public good



 
2. Develop experiential learning opportunities with public- and private-sector partners in the public interest technology space



 
3. Offer support to MPP graduates who pursue careers working in public-interest technology



 
4. Create mechanisms for faculty to receive recognition for the research, curriculum development, teaching, and service work needed to build public interest technology as an arena of inquiry



 
5. Provide institutional data that will allow us to measure the effectiveness in helping to develop the field of public-interest technology


 
The School of Public Policy is honored to be a part of this first-of-its-kind initiative connecting institutions such as Harvard University, Princeton University, Stanford University, and 17 other elite institutions to grow a new generation of technologists and technologically literate problem-solvers who can address the nation’s most pressing challenges in decades to come.
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Dr. Luisa Blanco Proposed Module on Retirement Knowledge Selected to be in the 2020 Health and Retirement Study https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/02/dr-luisa-blanco-proposed-module-retirement-knowledge-selected-be-2020-health/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/02/dr-luisa-blanco-proposed-module-retirement-knowledge-selected-be-2020-health Proposed a new module on "retirement knowledge" is selected to be included in the 2020 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) experimental modules. Fri, 22 Feb 2019 10:45:00 PST Luisa Blanco

Dr. Luisa Blanco, associate professor of economics and public policy at the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, continues to research the lack of financial planning and savings for retirement among United States adults.

Blanco, along with Dr. Sylvia Paz (UCLA) and Dr. Ron Hayes (UCLA), proposed a new module on "retirement knowledge" and is selected to be included in the 2020 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) experimental modules.

In past qualitative and quantitative studies, Blanco found Hispanics, the largest race and ethnic subgroup in California, to have low levels of self-reported retirement preparedness. Studies showed Hispanics to lack the understanding of high-level information and learning costs which prevents access to basic financial services. 

The proposed experimental module will consist of a retirement-knowledge scale appropriate for low- and medium-income English and non-native English speakers. The purpose is to develop a self-reporting scale that can be used in future studies to assess retirement knowledge and evaluate interventions that address this issue. This measure will be designed in both English and Spanish to reach the author's targeted audience of race and ethnic minorities. Although the module will measure Hispanics who are least likely to have any form of retirement savings, the scale will also be appropriate for high-income individuals, allowing measurement of financial literacy across the US. Taking the complexity of retirement knowledge into consideration, she believes it is important to develop scales that are linguistically and culturally appropriate.

Blanco, Paz, and Hayes will produce a manuscript based on the analysis of the data and description of methods used to design and test the proposed retirement knowledge scale. 

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School of Public Policy
Author Tim Carney to Lead Civic Engagement Discussion in Washington, DC https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/02/author-tim-carney-lead-civic-engagement-discussion-washington-dc/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/02/author-tim-carney-lead-civic-engagement-discussion-washington-dc The event will take place at the National Press Club on February 20. Mon, 18 Feb 2019 08:30:00 PST Tim CarneyPepperdine School of Public Policy and The Trinity Forum will co-host An Evening Conversation with Tim Carney, the author of Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse, with a response from Anne Snyder. Part of the Washington, DC Lecture Series: “Moral Sense in Politics and Policy” at the School of Public Policy, the event will take place at the National Press Club on Wednesday, February 20, at 6:30 PM EST.

The discussion will explore the ways in which America's social fabric is increasingly riven by the weakening of the moral, religious, and social institutions that helped form and reform individual and civic character—and engage the possibilities for re-energizing the organizations and institutions that help form character, instill hope, and reweave civic fabric.

For additional information about this free lecture, visit the School of Public Policy website.

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Feb 20: Trinity Forum, Alienated America https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/02/feb-20-trinity-forum-alienated-america/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/02/feb-20-trinity-forum-alienated-america The Pepperdine School of Public Policy and the Trinity Forum co-host an Evening Conversation in Washington, DC on Alienated America. Fri, 01 Feb 2019 09:15:00 PST Time Carney and Anne Snyder

Join the Trinity Forum and Pepperdine University School of Public Policy's American Project for an Evening Conversation on "Alienated America" with journalist and author Tim Carney on the release of his new book, Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse, with a response from Anne Snyder. This fascinating discussion will delve into the ways in which our social fabric is increasingly riven not only by economic strains, but the weakening of the moral, religious, and social institutions that helped form and reform individual and civic character—and engage the possibilities for re-energizing the organizations and institutions that help form character, instill hope, and reweave our civic Fabric.

 

Join us on Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (EST), at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, for this not-to-be-missed conversation! Our program will begin with light appetizers and drinks at 6:30 p.m., followed by remarks and audience questions.

 

This event is held in partnership with the Trinity Forum as part of their continuing series on the "Moral Sense in Politics and Policy."

 

About the "Moral Sense" Speakers Series: For the past seven years, the Pepperdine School of Public Policy has collaborated with Washington, DC's Trinity Forum in hosting twice-annual speaking events that look at the intersection of virtue and public policy. The phrase, "moral sense" is borrowed from one of the SPP founders—the late Dr. James Q. Wilson—who felt that effective public leadership demanded a more humanistic approach based in a rigorous liberal arts education.

 

Pepperdine alumni can register for free by emailing sppevents@pepperdine.edu.

Non-Pepperdine guests, please register here.

 

This event is held in partnership with the School of Public Policy's American Project, which is exploring the future of conservative thought and policy on issues ranging from religious liberty to foreign affairs.

 
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Author Margarita Mooney to Lead Education Discussion https://www.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/01/author-margarita-mooney-lead-education-discussion/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/university/2019/01/author-margarita-mooney-lead-education-discussion She will present “Can A Liberal Arts Education Survive in the Burnout Culture?” on January 28. Wed, 23 Jan 2019 11:00:00 PST West Los Angeles Graduate Campus - Pepperdine UniversityMargarita Mooney, associate professor of congregational studies at Princeton Theological Seminary, will present “Can A Liberal Arts Education Survive in the Burnout Culture?” at the West Los Angeles Graduate Campus on Monday, January 28, at 5:30 PM.

Hosted by Pepperdine School of Public Policy, the discussion will explore how universities exist to preserve and expand knowledge, yet an education that is integrated with community life, contemplation, and culture furthers authentic and integral human freedom. Given changes in technology, debates about free speech, concerns about psychological well-being, and desires for diversity and inclusion, professors and administrators face increasing expectations from students, parents, and the larger society to expand their scope of activities well beyond the classroom. As a result, a return to a classical liberal arts education should be coupled with a transformative model of education that provides students with opportunities to reflect on their identities and commitments, and build strong friendships and communities needed for the knowledge acquired to be personally and socially transformative.

In examining these concepts, Mooney will address the questions "What is the purpose of a university?" and "What educational practices support the proper ends of education?"

Mooney is a scholar, author, educator, mentor, and public speaker with interests in integrating sociological, philosophical, and theological approaches to virtues and the common good. At Princeton Theological Seminary, she teaches classes on the philosophy of social science, religion and social theory, and intentional communities. 

In 2016 Mooney started Scala Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to reinvigorating classical liberal arts education and preserving the ideas and practices necessary to maintain a free society. The foundation’s reading groups, dinner seminars, and travel events emphasize hospitality and friendship, aiming to help students connect their intellectual development with character formation and generating transformative educational experiences and authentic friendships. 

She is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively entitled Living a Broken Life, Beautifully that explores the religious lives of young adults who have experienced traumatic life events. Mooney's research has been funded by two grants from the John Templeton Foundation totaling more than $3 million.

To learn more about this event, and to register to attend, visit the School of Public Policy website.

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School of Public Policy
Jan 28: Examining Liberal Arts Education with Dr. Margarita Mooney https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/01/jan-28-examining-liberal-arts-education-dr-margarita-mooney/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/01/jan-28-examining-liberal-arts-education-dr-margarita-mooney Addressing the questions, "What is the purpose of a university?" and "What educational practices support the proper ends of education?" Fri, 18 Jan 2019 11:15:00 PST Liberal Arts Education

Join the School of Public Policy at the Pepperdine West Los Angeles campus on Monday, January 28, 2019, at 5:30 PM for a thought-provoking lecture entitled, "Can A Liberal Arts Education Survive in the Burnout Culture?" We welcome Dr. Margarita Mooney, an associate professor from Princeton Theological Seminary to host this discussion as she addresses the questions, "What is the purpose of a university?" and "What educational practices support the proper ends of education?"

Universities exist to preserve and expand knowledge, yet an education that is integrated with community life, contemplation, and culture furthers authentic and integral human freedom. Given changes in technology, debates about free speech, concerns about psychological well-being, and desires for diversity and inclusion; professors and administrators face increasing expectations from students, parents, and the larger society to expand their scope of activities well beyond the classroom. The current challenges in higher education may actually be an opportunity to reimagine the classical idea of a university to direct human freedom towards the personal and common good. A return to a classical liberal arts education should be coupled with a transformative model of education that provides students with opportunities to reflect on their identities and commitments and build strong friendships and communities needed for the knowledge acquired to be personally and societally transformative.

Learn more and register for this event. Click here for directions to the Pepperdine West LA Campus.

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School of Public Policy
Listen: Pete Peterson, Townhall Review on Conservative Thought https://publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/newsroom/2019/01/listen-pete-peterson-townhall-review-conservative-thought/ https://newsroom.pepperdine.edu/publicpolicy/2019/01/listen-pete-peterson-townhall-review-conservative-thought How the 2018 midterm election shows the trend away from conservatism. Tue, 15 Jan 2019 13:30:00 PST Pete Peterson

On January 2, 2019, Michael Medved interviewed Pete Peterson, dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, on the 2018 midterms and how the trend revealed moving away from conservatism. What can be done now to prepare leaders who work across the aisle?

Listen to "Michael Medved and Pete Peterson on Conservative Thought Amidst Pervasive Leftist Academia."

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School of Public Policy