Monte Cox Presents 32nd Annual William M. Green Distinguished Christian Scholar Lecture

October 25, 2011  | 1 min read

Monte Cox, dean of the College of Bible and Religion at Harding University, addressed the theme “Through a Glass Dimly: Christian Knowing in a Pluralistic World,” during Pepperdine’s 32nd annual William M. Green Distinguished Christian Scholar Lecture on October 3 in Stauffer Chapel. Cox’s presentation focused on the epistemological shift that is driving worldview-level changes in Western culture, and offered a Christian response to those changes.

“I hear many Christian figures speaking about ‘postmodernism’ as if it is only an enemy of the Christian worldview,” says Cox. “At the heart of the ‘postmodern’ movement is a different view of knowledge. As theologian Millard Erickson has written, ‘modern’ people understood knowledge to be certain, objective, and good. The most radical forms of ‘postmodern’ philosophy would strongly disagree with all three of those descriptors.”

Cox served as a missionary to Kenya from 1982 to 1992, when he began teaching full-time at Harding. He served as director of the Center for World Missions until 2008, when he accepted the position as dean of the College of Bible and Religion. Cox also teaches courses in missions, anthropology, world religions, North American culture, and textual Bible, and continues to have an integral part in the Center for World Missions.

The William M. Green Distinguished Christian Scholar Lecture Program began in 1980 to perpetuate the memory of the accomplished Christian scholar William M. Green. Throughout the years, these lectures have featured outstanding scholars from Churches of Christ. Pepperdine offers the program to provide its students with a forum for the advancement of Christian scholarship.